Newsroom

Texas Breast Specialists prides itself with keeping the community involved. Read the latest news here:

  • Making Spirits Bright: Texas Oncology
    FACETS: The Kendra Scott Blog

    Dr. Julie Sprunt, a breast surgeon with Texas Breast Specialists-Austin and Bastrop, discusses how invaluable it is for organizations to visit and support patients undergoing rigorous cancer treatments as part of Kendra Scott's annual gifting events during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Matters of the Heart: How Values Bring Meaning to Patient-Centered Cancer Care
    Healthy Magazine; Cleburne Times-Review

    The approach to cancer care is transforming so that what the patient “wants” is more likely to be what he or she gets. Cancer indeed changes many things in a patient’s life, but not the essence of who you are. Before, during, and after treatment, your personal values, perspectives, and cultural and religious beliefs are an important constant – the glue that holds you together during challenging times. Today, those values can also play a direct role in cancer care.

  • Vickie Evans: The Importance of Routine Screenings
    The Austin American-Statesman 

    What’s so funny about cancer? For professional public speaker and improv comedienne Vickie Sokol Evans, a sense of humor and fearlessness required in performing comedy were essential to her successful fight against breast cancer.

  • Brenda Jones Tompkins: Cancer Patient Looks Back With Gratitude
    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Following her husband's advice, she called her gynecologist to discuss the symptom. After consulting with her gynecologist, Brenda was referred to Dr. Jennifer Snow, a breast surgeon at Texas Breast Specialists–Southwest Fort Worth, a part of Texas Oncology. The surgeon was highly recommended by other women who had breast procedures.

  • Cancer Patient Learns Caring for Yourself Is a Gift to Others
    Fort Worth Star-Telegram

    Like countless other women, Angie Girgenti put off getting her annual mammogram. Life was hectic for the 45-year-old, who was still reeling from the sudden death of her husband, Nick, two days after Christmas 2013. The gregarious, "full of life Italian" suffered a heart attack while sleeping.

  • How One Woman's Brush with Breast Cancer Changed Her Perspective on Preventive Health
    Dallas Morning News

    Throughout her adult life, Karen Kissinger avoided doctors, checkups and mammograms due to her fibrocystic breast disease, which causes lumpy, fibrous, noncancerous tissues to form in the breasts. She even put off performing self-examinations because she was unable to tell one lump from another.

  • Texas Oncology on Breast Cancer Awareness
    KTBC-TV, Austin

    Dr. Bridget O'Brien, a breast surgical oncologist at Texas Oncology-Cedar Park, visited KTBC-TV’s “Good Day Austin” to dispel myths, emphasize prevention methods and discuss screening recommendations related to Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • 4 Things to Know About Breast Cancer
    KVUE-TV, Austin

    Dr. Julie Sprunt, a surgeon with Texas Breast Specialists-Austin and Bastrop, shared four tips women should know about breast cancer risk, screening, detection and prevention for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Linda Cummins and Bekah Thomas: Teaming Up Against Breast Cancer on the Tennis Court
    The Austin American-Statesman

    For Linda Cummins and Bekah Thomas, their bond on the tennis court strengthened them for their fights against breast cancer. Dr. Debra Patt, Dr. Beth Hellerstedt, and Dr. Heather King have led the charge on fighting the two women’s breast cancer.

  • When the Elephant in the Room is Pink
    Cleburne Times Review, Cleburne

    Breakthroughs in breast cancer treatment have helped create more than 3 million survivors in the U.S. Jennifer Snow, a breast surgeon at Texas Oncology, talks with the Cleburne Times Review about managing metastatic breast cancer. While some women live for many years with this disease, survival rate is only three years on average. It's difficult to talk about recurrence risk, and Dr. Snow says this pink elephant in the room is a profound challenge for patients in the oncology community.